Cover of: Api and the boy stranger | Patricia Roddy Read Online
Share

Api and the boy stranger a village creation tale by Patricia Roddy

  • 33 Want to read
  • ·
  • 64 Currently reading

Published by Dial Books for Young Readers in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Côte d"Ivoire.

Subjects:

  • Folklore -- Côte d"Ivoire.

Book details:

About the Edition

In this Ivory Coast legend, Api and her family are repaid for their kindness to a stranger with a mysterious warning to leave their village and go to the other side of the river Amman.

Edition Notes

StatementPatricia Roddy ; pictures by Lynne Russell.
ContributionsRussell, Lynne, ill.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPZ8.1.R64 Ap 1994
The Physical Object
Pagination1 v. (unpaged) :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1400580M
ISBN 100803712227, 0803712219
LC Control Number93008359

Download Api and the boy stranger

PDF EPUB FB2 MOBI RTF

This legend from the Ivory Coast takes the form of a cautionary tale, used to teach children to share their food. Young Api listens to the comforting rhythms of village women as they prepare a. Api and the boy stranger: a village creation tale. [Patricia Roddy; Lynne Russell, (Illustrator)] -- In this Ivory Coast legend, Api and her family are repaid for their kindness to a stranger with a mysterious warning to leave their village and go to the other side of the river Amman.   Once again, only Api's family pays attention to the boy, feeding him and heeding his advice. As they travel, their village is engulfed by a fiery volcano, and the sounds of destruction cleverly repeat the cooking noises described earlier. Api's family establishes a new village, which "to this day is always willing to share its food with strangers."Author: Patricia Roddy. Api and the boy stranger. Api and the boy stranger is based on a legend from Ivory Coast. There is a pronunciation guide and glossary in the front of the book. There is an author's note in the back of the book giving background to the story and the traditional legend on .

The title character of The Stranger is Meursault, a Frenchman who lives in Algiers (a pied-noir). The novel is famous for its first lines: “Mother died today. Or maybe it was yesterday, I don’t know.” They capture Meursault’s anomie briefly and brilliantly. After this introduction, the reader follows Meursault through the novel’s first-person narration to Marengo, where he sits vigil at the place of his mother’s death. The fourth DCI Tom Douglas thriller from master story teller and author Rachel Abbott, "Stranger Child", delivers with non stop heart palpitating suspense. Douglas is still in a relationship with Leonora "Leo" Harris, and still moping over the loss of his older brother Jack a couple of years back/5(). Albert Camus THE STRANGER I had a feeling he was blaming me for something, and started to explain. But he cut me short. “There’s no need to excuse yourself, my boy. I’ve looked up the record and obviously you weren’t in a position to see that she was properly cared for. She.   The Stranger demanded of Camus the creation of a style at once literary and profoundly popular, an artistic sleight of hand that would make the complexities of a man's life appear simple. Despite appearances, though, neither Camus nor Meursault ever tried to .

The Stranger is not merely one of the most widely read novels of the 20th century, but one of the books likely to outlive it. Written in , Camus's compelling and troubling tale of a disaffected, apparently amoral young man has earned a durable popularity (and remains a staple of U.S. high school literature courses) in part because it reveals so vividly the anxieties of its s: K. Book questions and reading guides/discussion guides for book clubs - more than printable reading guides for exceptional books. The Stranger, a novel by Harlan Coben; The Stranger (Applegate novel), a book in the Animorphs series; The Stranger (Van Allsburg book), a book by Chris Van Allsburg; The Stranger (short story collection), a book by Gordon R. Dickson "The Stranger" (Mansfield short story), a short story by Katherine Mansfield. The novel is from the POV of Wilde, the man with the mysterious path found in the woods as a boy or Hester, the famous criminal defense attorney, and Coben uses brilliantly to showcase her role in Reviews: K.